Take a look at the theories behind why earthquakes occur, what makes them so hard to predict and the warning system technologies we rely on today.

In 132 CE, Zhang Heng presented his latest invention: a large vase he claimed could tell them whenever an earthquake occurred for hundreds of miles. Today, we no longer rely on pots as warning systems, but earthquakes still offer challenges to those trying to track them. Why are earthquakes so hard to anticipate, and how could we get better at predicting them? Jean-Baptiste P. Koehl investigates.

Lesson by Jean-Baptiste P. Koehl, directed by Cabong Studios.

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